About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CNBC 13
CSPAN2 10
KCSM (PBS) 5
KRCB (PBS) 4
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
KQED (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
CNN 1
FBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 52
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)
have debts they cannot repay. they have three loans adding up to more than 300,000 euros in total. >> it was so easy to get credit. no questions asked. they just gave us something to sign, and we did not read the small print. if you do not have a regular income and cannot make the payments and you are two or three months behind, then you have to pay a late fee. the apartment has and 85,000- euro mortgage, and we pay up to 200 euros a month just to cover the interest. >> they are not alone. cyprus has the highest level of private household debt in the entire eurozone. when the supreme economy was booming and everyone had jobs, private individuals borrowed some 20 billion euros from banks to buy cars and set up businesses, but this crisis has left many unable to pay back their loans. >> i cannot pay my debt because no customers are coming to my shop, and in addition to the credit, i have to pay rent and wages. >> my loan is 1/5 of my salary, which means it is a balanced loan by the government. >> i need to pay 30,000 pounds each year so my son can study in england. i borrow money to
.5%, and a similar story for the euro stoxx 50. in new york, trading still under way for the dow jones industrial average, and it is not doing a lot. very little change. the euro trading for $1.3323. >> the chairman of a german steel producer has admitted to making mistakes, saying his supervisory board could have done better, but those mistakes have led to some huge losses for the company. >> the executive dick -- the executive is accused of failing to stop multi-billion dollar projects that went wrong. >> shareholders and employees are pointing the finger at the supervisory board chairman. they accuse him of failing to question bad board decisions. at the general meeting, he fought back, saying he has no intention of stepping down. >> if you ask me whether as a board we could have done things better, i will honestly say yes. we trusted people for too long. we could or should have acted sooner, but we did act once we saw what was going on if we had the appropriate facts, and we acted with resolve. >> hopes for the company's future lie with the new ceo. he fired three top executives last month af
. the problem is, of course, that he has euro skeptics breathing down his neck in britain in his own party, and i think he is banking on germany and france in particular wanting very much to keep britain in the club, which, of course, they do, but i think he may be puckering too high. the german business community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting d
stronger than expected. it rose in january, current conditions 108 versus the expectations of 107. euro/dollar is about 1% higher on the back of that news. the ifo institute, current conditions, 108. headline index, 104.2 versus 103. ross, what do you make of it? >> well, you can see what's going on with the euro there, 134. let's get more from finland. good to see you, alex. thanks indeed for joining us. the defense here that we're no longer in crisis fighting mode, the question as we look at data in germany, the question is whether we've made a fundamental turn, a fundamental change and whether things are temporary. >> i certainly hope we've made a fundamental turn. if this crisis is 100 steps, i'd say we are about 60 steps down the road. now, really, we have the fundamental institutional things in place. so that has calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. g
the european politicians and believing in the euro project, are you? >> well, i was. breaking up, wouldn't be here -- >> you're going to tell me that you're convicted on the aussie/dollar. >> no, i'm not convicted. i'm admitting that i've been wrong. we think aussie is terribly overvalued and that's the problem, frankly. >> good to have you on. plenty more to come from you. the ecb is going to keep its interest rates at a record low today. that's what we expect, anyway. the markets will be listening to the delivery tone of mario draghi's delivery. silvia wadhwa is back at her delivery post. 2013 [ speaking foreign language ]. >> everything is going to stay the same. the ecb hasn't got anything to do right now. they've pretty much said everything on track, probably the best, cheapest intervention they had so far was the program. every month announced again. we stand ready to act, but so far they haven't had to do anything because nobody has asked for an omt program yet. but the market believes that the ecb is there as the backstop. so far, that was very successful. in terms of anything el
in east london, the euro cafe is serving up british toast and italian coffee, and the patrons are discussing the european question. >> we should be allowed a say at some point. >> we are definitely part of europe, and i think we will be too small outside of europe. >> but not all londoners are as pro-eu as those in the euro cafe. >> we definitely need to renegotiate our position. it certainly detracts from what we could contribute to our own economy, which is sorely needed. >> i know we can still means -- retain a relationship with our members without necessarily the party. m a cameron's position is one of a strong britain in a more relaxed european alliance, and he says that is something he will fight for. >> david heyman is making his own position very difficult. britain's fate will hinge on its european partners. -- david cameron is making his own position very difficult. if they do not agree, britain is headed toward the exit door, and this is something the prime minister does not want at all. >> cameron's speech has been troubled for months, and battle lines are already b
on for their livelihoods. britain exports an annual 80 million euros worth of scallops. the fishing season lasts all year, unlike in france. britain also sells scallops at lower prices and even exports them to france. the french are angered by the thriving british shellfish industry. in normandy, fnce,he attaches are more modest -- the catches are more modest. they cannot fish all year round, giving stocks time to replenish, but their efforts as sustainability are punishing them, they say. >> we've been trying to maintain stocks for years, but they come along and sees all the shellfish from under our noses. we do not think this is acceptable. >> every country's trawlers have an allotted number of days at sea. for these to be cut, a british trawler men would have to fish elsewhere and would not do all their fishing in the english channel -- for this to be cut, a british trawler -- for these to be cut, british trawlermen would have to fish elsewhere. the closed season means the french would not use up all their days. >> we hope we can negotiate with the french to have a swap of effort for us to stay out of
place because of the euro zone and that is why i think it's right to resell our relationship with europe and then to trust the people. >> thank you, mr. speaker. [inaudible] recent revolutions show about the secretive series abuse of powers continues with involvement of the police and the security services. will be prime minister have an investigation into the scandal that has ruined, continues to run the lives of many hard-working men, women, and their families? >> the honorable member quite rightly raised the issue that i know the opposition will be racing today in the debate and let me say the blacklisting that occurred was a completely unacceptable project that i think the previous government was right to bring in legislation to make it unlawful. we've seen no evidence that the blacklisting regulations introduced are not doing their job and the company responsible was shut down in 2000. at me say this but i do welcome the openness and frankness that labour are using to look at something that went wrong while they were in office. >> thank you, mr. speaker. my right honorable friend in
/dollar, 11.6236. euro/dollar, 1.3166. kind of where we were yesterday. asian markets in china and japan will be catching up on news on the u.s. fiscal cliff deal. we'll get december sales figures from japan's retailing. the owner of stores are set to release its q1 earnings today. samsung electronics is expected to post its q4 earnings guidance. that's all on the agenda in asia. but what investors are to do with what we've got so far this year? joining us now, nicholas. these are the classic risk off day yesterday. how do you categorize it and what it means for -- >> well, i mean, obviously, you know, i think it's important to be clear that this was a rally not based -- based not on what the deal did, but what the deal undid. clearly, the good news is that the u.s. americansfully avoided an even bigger fiscal issue. but, you know, i think clearly it shows how low we've actually sunk in the realm of investors expectations when the markets are actually rallying on essentially muddling through. and this is a well trodden path. it's a fairly familiar tale. and we've obviously seen it in the
. euro/dollar, we've traded between 1.30, 1.50, 1.32 the last couple of weeks. that's where we stand in europe. we have the latest out of asia. >>> thank you. a mixed day of trade finish asian borses. the nikkei snapped a two-day losing streak ending .7% higher. talk as the boj set to ease its monetary policy this month by boosting its asset purchase program. after a brief pause yesterday the yen weakened against the u.s. dollar again today fueling automakers and other exporter stocks. >>> elsewhere, the shanghai finished flat as investors remained cautious ahead of trade and cip data due out. reports that more property curves will be made itted to tame rising housing prices. agricultural stocks surged on expectations that beijing's urban growth plan will support food production. in hong kong, the hang seng rebounded half a percent from the lowest level in the week. mainly banks gained momentum after ubs upgraded icbc. concerns over q4 earnings sent the kospi lower by .3%. the fifth straight day of losses for south korean shares. i.t. stocks and development ralliers pushed higher .4%
in the euro zone picture than fundamental change in europe. second, there's a crisis that competitiveness is other nations across the world sora had. and third, there is a gap between the e.u. and its citizens which has grown dramatic way in years. it is democratic accountability in consent that is yet particularly cute way if we don't address these challenges, i do not want that to happen. i want the european to be a success and the relationship between britain and keeps sna. that is why i'm here today to acknowledge the nature of the challenges we face and to set out how i believe the european union should respond to them and what i want to achieve for britain in its place within the european union conservative nature of the challenges for me. there are some serious questions that will define the future of the european union and the future of every country within it. digging in is changing to help fix the current scene that has profound implications for all of us, whether in the single current era not. britain is not in the single currency and are not to be. when you do yours don't have
this morning been up to 89.35. euro/yen higher, stipulating around the 118 mark, as well. euro/dollar had big moves yesterday, posting with the spanish auction mr. draghi and the ecb coming out saying it was unanimous about no interest rate cuts whereas in the previous month there had been some discussion about that. euro/dollar, 11.3260. let's bring you up to speed with the asian trading session today as they wrap up the week. li sixuan joins us for the first time today. >> thanks, ross. japan was a clear outperformer after shinzo abe unveiled his massive stimulus plan. and the nikkei gained 1.4% today. just to put it into context, this index is up for the ninth straight week, its longest winning streak since late 1988. shares of stocks surged to nearly 5% after the operator of clothing chain unicore raised its full year guidance. but hotter than expected cpi data from china put new pressure on the shanghai deposit. there will be more curbs to taint housing prices. meanwhile, weakness in china's blue chips dropped the hang seng lower. but hsbc did lend some support after the bank said yester
've been up to 89.67. euro/yen, up if you recall, 1119.34 is where we stand at the moment. euro/dollar, 11.335 55, holding on to the gains that we have seen on that particular cross rates. we have industrial production coming out in under an hour's time. that's where we trade right in and out in europe. let bring you the first update of the day from asia. li sixuan is out of singapore. >> hi. thank you, ross. asian markets mostly in the green today. and the outperformer is still china's shanghai composite hitting a seven-month high. this after security regulators said beijing can't miss the quota for investment markets. if you recall, late last week, a top official tr china's signal said growth could come in at 7.7. surpassing beijing's target of 7.5%. sen second mainland stocks finished with .64%. over 15% after profit warnings. and the market is out of action today celebrating the coming of age day. mon tar policy does have an impact on the yen today. the japanese currency soft.ed to a the 1/2 year low against the greenback. we'll see how that market reacts when it comes back online tomo
bankrupt. very soon if the entire country had gone bankrupt. due to the structure of the euro zone where countries without a central bank behind them needed -- bailout of the banks and where the banks needed to continue lending money to bankrupt states, -- there was a domino effect because of the banks that were untrustworthy and the untrustworthy countries that they were associated with. this was the point in which the european union refused to realistically look at the situation. they decided that it was better to act, that it was just a crisis of public debt, and they did not -- instead of accepting that they had a poorly designed a currency union, they decided to implement austerity packages to ponte economies that were on the brink of bankruptcy. securing their default, in this way they created a recession that was not necessary for us to have. and they insisted in doing. at the cost, at great human co cost. and at a terrible cost for democracy. ladies and gentlemen, understanding here before you today, and i'm very sorry, but i'm going to say but i have to say this, none of these l
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute britain can't work out os own special deal. the
of the european military system was for the euro and it was the work of franco-german relations. >> they paid tribute to the fallen of the first world war. germany and france would stand by one another. the current german and french leaders are hardly united in the struggle for stability of the european currency, but some say that is nothing new. >> there is one thing to take from 50 years since the treaty is that we do make a difference. but this is perhaps not the worst strategy for getting through the current crisis. >> for more, we have our correspondent from the parliamentary studios. franco-german relations have been put to the test over the last year. has it caused by problems to date? >> of course the two have had their cautious over the strategy meant in tackling the eurozone debt crisis. we know that merkel is very fond of talking about universality. the clashes have been stronger between other heads of government between france and germany in the past 30 years. it is so fundamental to the sense of their identity. any clashes will not seriously rock about. >> why not britain or any
to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear energy needs. >> the corzine were the original inhabitants of southern africa. for at least 2000 years, the hunted, herded, and gathered on the land and the sea. skeletons in the sand and evidence of what and where they ate. >> maybe they ate the food out of the jars. >> the land was seized by colonialists. under apartheid, their identity was further fracturing the proposal to build a nuclear power station here is unacceptable. >> they take our land. they are ready to take our identity away from us. everything we have got, they take away from us. now what is left for us is only -- >> these artifacts were all collected here. she and her husband, a traditional healer, are trying to preserve a culture they say is not respected. they do not have former first reform of first nation indigenous that as yet. -- they do not have formal first
% of those surveyed would prefer the uk to leave the euro. >> i should have said leave the european union. britain can't leave that monetary issue. we'll have plenty more on the relationship between britain and europe. for now, we can look at the relationship with markets. the euro stoxx 6700 is down about 0.4% today. not a done of differentiation. the biggest gainer, interestingly, is monti paschi. some of the airlines are struggling, too, on the back of ryan air's results. now take a look at what's happening across the bourses. we're seeing somewhat again of a trading pattern here after the last several trading sessions where it's not consistent. we'll get those up for you just as soon as we can. today, it's down pretty much across the board. the ibex shedding 0.12%. the cac 400.15% the. the xetra dax is also down 0.1%. the ftse 1100, same thing. pretty consistent story across these indexes here. it's a big week for earnings, too. in the meantime, let's take a look at the bond wall. it's been interesting, actually, to see the lack of action, lack of attention markets have been paying he
. if these companies are going to want an ever closer union as a result of the problems created by the euro, why should britain not want to take advantage of the changing your pandemic to give britain a chance to become more competitive? the changes going to happen. we want that changed to be a direction that suits the british people. >> i can see you gesticulating. did you want to come in? >> we have become competitive within the european union. germany has given the example, we were able to become competitive. we of a higher debt ratio the most of the member states in the eurozone. higher unemployment questions. this has nothing to do with the european union, other countries have shown that you can be successful within the european union. here we would like to cooperate with britain, as germans we would like to have them in, but to change the conditions of the treaty, we would do better through legislation. >> dr. fox, you are on the record as welcoming this speech, but some will question what is your welcoming. for starters, we do not know what the renegotiated union would look like. on the one hand
. will israel bomb iran and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids small solutions on those it does address. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slo
long. euro/dollar, who cares about that one today? let's talk more about china. we'll head out to hong kong for in-depth analysis. intel giving investors the jitters with a disappointing forecast and a massive increase in capital spending. we'll look at those figures just after 10:20 central european time. 16 minutes later, we'll head out to bangor to talk to the ceo of wipro. >>> and the hostage crisis continues in algeria. we'll have the latest news right after the break. stay with us. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> welcome back to the program. a spokesman for the british foreign office says the uk government has received no words that the hostage crisis in algeria is over. most of the reports suggests dozens might have been killed during a rescue operation carried out
major challenges confronting us today. first, the problems in the euro zone are driving fundamental change in europe. second, there is a crisis of european competitiveness as other nations across the world sort ahead. and third, there is a gap between the eu and its citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years. and which represents a lack of democratic accountability in consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift towards the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success. and i want a relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. that is why i am here today. to acknowledge the nature of the challenges we face, and to set out how i believe the european union should respond to them. and to explain what i want to achieve for britain and its place within the european union. so let me start with the nature of the challenges we face. first, the euro zone. the future shape of europe is being forge
worried about the euro, the fiscal cliff, saw it as a safe currency. with the rest of the world stabilizing everyone's looking at the u.k.'s underlying fundamentals, no growth, lack of competitiveness, banks talking about weaker sterling. sterling looks vulnerable. >> what happens with the government's finances? the ocd's come out said public spending for 2012, 49% of gdp. it was 49.6% 2011. it was supposed to go down, it went up. >> the gdp numbers were much weaker than expected. we thought there would be a decent recovery in activity. it's than public spending overshot, it's that gdp has undershot. from the ratio point of view you've ended up with a higher level of public spending. >> when you talk it weakness in sterling, what is hsbc saying -- >> against 1.8150. not a huge fall but sterling is one of the weakest of the -- generally soft currencies over the next few months. >> before you go, let's move away from the u.k. just give us your -- your general view of how 2013's going to shape out on a global economy. >> it's a great rotation in the sense that i think we'll see a d
market expectations. taking a look at the euro against the yen, that's quoted at 118.29-32. let's take a look at stocks now. tokyo share prices are lower. as the yen is gaining ground. the nikkei average trading at 10,651. that is a loss of a little over half a percent from tuesday's close. market sources say investors are selling many stocks but especially export-related issues, and that is due to the yen's strength as well as the fact that the b.o.j.'s measures were almost as anticipated. okay. in other asian markets we are seeing seoul regain that 2,000 level. it is up by 1/5 of a percent at the moment. taking a look at australia, the benchmark index is trading higher by a third of a percent at 4,794. >>> well, the japanese government plans to help the ship-building industry in the northeast region which was hit by the march 2011 disaster. the government plans to subsidize ship builders when they jointly build facilities such as dry docks. the subsidies will cover 2/3 of the cost. in the earthquake and ensuing tsunami 37 ship-yards along the pacific coast were severely damaged. infr
are moving a bit lower today. forex, the euro/dollar is one to watch, up 0.1% today. 1.3330. people are talking about how the ltr payment amounts to tightening. the question then becomes for some of the weaker economies whether it's too strong. dollar/yen moving up today. the yen is weakening by about 0.1%. fitch is saying british banks could need more capital. this has certainly been a theme. something, in fact, out in davos. ross, maria and everyone has been asking banks do they play to raise more capital? ross, what do they have to say about that? >> well, look, there's a lot of folks. what was interesting is when we spoke to the barclay's ceo mr. jenkins this morning said the whole industry when they were growing revenues didn't have to worry too much about costs. now they have to focus on the cost side of the business, which we know they're going to have a transformal plan and that's what they're going to be doing, as well. . capital requirements, how much capital is right when you're still going through periods of contracting growth because, obviously, the higher capital you h
, there is some growing optimism that greece will remain in the euro. the greek stock market has soared over the last year from a little -- from a very low base. transport workers are staging another 24-hour stoppage today. a doctor strike has left hospitals functioning with emergency staff. this comes after the greek finance minister told us that the bbc that he was expressing optimism about the growth outlook. our correspondent tells us why these workers are striking. >> the humanitarian catastrophe that has unfolded here in the last few years is very real. does bear in mind the figures -- just bear in mind the figures. it is staggeringly high unemployment. you have hospitals running out of medicine. schools are running out of textbooks. you have kids who are now having to have food vouchers in schools because their parents cannot afford to feed them. homelessness and poverty are soaring. that is the real cost of greece 's financial crisis, and it is very dramatic inedeed. >> let's move on. some of you think it's too early in the day. it's got to be 6:00 p.m. somewhere. today, half-year re
provided little market direction. dollar/yen at 88.29. we're seeing the euro is weaker against the yen. euyou're 0/yen at 117.79. >>> the labor union for japan's regional government workers is calling for the withdrawal of the central government's plan to reduce tax grants. the state government wants to cut local tax grants from fiscal 2013 starting this april. it's partly designed to slash regional government workers' wages by an average of 7.8%. the chairman of the all-japan precede tech furl and municipal workers union told reporters wednesday the plan is unacceptable. >> translator: this one-sided policy that the state is going to implement unilaterally has been drafted by skipping all the labor management negotiations. >> tokanaba said local governments are striving to cut workers to deal with the shortage of funds even though they're faced with more tasks in the their everyday work. he said they include social security issues and environmental protection measures. tokanaga added some municipalities have even pressed ahead with their own wage cuts. >>> that is going to do it for b
mechanism in order to protect the euro. now we have it. now it is in place. and that's an excellent advantage. on the other hand, for financial and fiscal solidity we have the so-called fiscal compact. this, too, is in force ever since the beginning of this year, and there's now a particular point where we have to continue working, so we have improved fiscal consolidation, we have better, binding commitments, better tools, we have better mechanisms. we also have as regards banking supervision made considerable progress as of 2014, we will have a banking supervision in place in the eurozone in which, obviously, also other european countries can participate. but we're still lacking, and that's something that we need to do this year, 2013, is to see to it that over the next few years to come we also have a convergence in competitiveness within the common euro area. so not somewhere where we are sort of, um, expecting the lowest common denominator, but competitiveness that measures wealth against the best of us and against the best on the global markets. and showing us access to global
's something that has been off on the equity markets. positive comments, relinch aunc the euro. >> i remember when euro was in the last debt gross. wrong. >> great britain, uk, still eurozone. >> a lot of commotion down here. we look at the live feed from davos, switzerland. >> they're not happy. [ bell ringing ] >> at the nasdaq, starz celebrating its spin-off from liberty media. >> there's speculation about starz. but when i talked to a number of people who run various media companies, it might have been considered as buyers of that. they're saying, not me, check with that guy, and he said, not me, check with that other guy. we'll see if there's a potential acquirer of starz. >> netflix yesterday in the conference call, hastings was saying the great cable channels need us. you can't just jump in. before "breaking bad" you need a stream. >> netflix stepped in where starz has stepped out. >> s&p gainers for the year, netflix number one. >> is that true? >> up almost 59%. number two. best buy, number three dell, if you can believe that. >> name me three stocks that have come back from the dead
of the changes taking place in the euro zone which is driving a lot of the change in the european union that every opportunity to achieve that settlements and seek consent for it. >> mr. speaker, you like foreign travel, trade delegations, meeting for leaders, but he is not too keen on the detailed policies. does the prime minister know anybody else like that? >> all morning for that -- it is important that we have ministers in both houses who are linking up with the fastest growing country anywhere in the world. that is why exports to china are up 50%, exports to india are up 50% and we are connecting britain with other parts of the world. >> bearing in mind bills which are thought to affect the royal prerogative require the signification of the queen at second reading, can the prime minister tell us whether he has yet heard whether it regards any of the major constitutional changes proposed in successions of the crowd bill as in fruiting either on the royal prerogative for the coronation of which are majesty talked? >> what i can say to my right hon. friend is throughout the process,
, mr. speaker. like the prime minister, i want to see a fresh a settlement for euro. german beer drinkers made 13 times more duty than british drinkers. and spanish drinkers -- british drinkers paid 9.2% in spanish tankers and 10,000 more duty than spanish drinkers. will he take the chancellor for a pint? and do something for british pubs and british republicans speak with my honorable friend quite rightly speaks up for -- i remember visiting the great bravery with him during the last election. i'm sure the chancellor would have listened very carefully to what he said but i think it's very important that we action also tried to support the pub trade in the country and the government has planned for that as well. >> mr. speaker, thousands of my constituents in insulated homes fear high sky whether built. they are 7% interest charges with only five households signed up for it. how has the prime minister achieved this fiasco? >> i would say to the honorable gentleman i hope you'll welcome the green deal because it gives households the opportunity to cut their bills and to cut their
against the euro, which is at 11-3358. and gold prices are down, $1,678.20 an ounce. >>> michael corbett says the bank has the right status to generate future growth. speaking at the world economic forum in davos, he tells cnbc that several years worth of revamping efforts are beginning to pay off. >> over the last year, we've simplified the company a lot the. we've become smaller, we've become simpler. >> corbat took over in october after the resignation of chief vickram pandit. >> very sharp in the stripes. >> yeah. >> the gegco, do we have a shot at him? >> no. >> that looks pretty good. there's product in there. what do you think, it's water? there is product. and, you know -- >> davos, they tend to walk out with wet hair and it turns to ice. >> but people don't look that good in davos, normally. >> that's true. >> he looks like a banker there. i think he has a lot of potential as far as his looks go. in the world economic forum in davos is in full swing. let's get to andrew buzzing in the mountains of switzerland. you're a big apple-phile, too. >> you're hoping people look good in d
-fledged member. using the euro and everything else. i guess it makes it less likely that they'll adopt a common currency. if they're thinking about leaving the union. >> absolutely. no, there's a widespread sense of relief that britain isn't more closely tied in. if you leak at the performance of the economy, the fact britain has its own central bank, it can pursue monetary policies or policies appropriate for britain and not have to worry about other member states certainly is being taken as a sign of relief. and there's very little sentiment certainly for joining the euro now. although i will say the bank of england numbers fight they're not happy with how strong sterling is. they think currency should be weaker and it could help performance going forward. echoing the currency that we're starting to hear this year. >> no talk about becoming the 51st state which they probably have wanted to do for a while given how we excelled after we broke off. they could come back into the fold, perhaps joining the u.s. and adopt the dollar if they really wanted some -- any talk of that at this point? would
. written -- britain. >> i will tell you why germany is doing so much better, it is the euro. germany is an exporting country, and they export to their neighbors. it prevents their neighbors from devaluing their currency. >> where is the context for your numbers? i am sure you are not advocating borrowing 40 cents on the dollar. [indiscernible] >> i said they are in a crisis because of decades of certain policies. >> that have put together an unsustainable federation. >> put him back on my washington hat as we move along, one of the most successful theories on our blog has been this is where your money went. people in europe and the united states stand up with signs saying what kind of government money they get, whether it's health care, welfare. the one that went viral was the author of the harry potter books proudly standing with the dole in front of her. she and her family were supported by government benefits before she became a billionaire. should we not give everyone a chance? we are going to have more people who can either fall through the cracks or come back and be productive
the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a half in/half out role for the u.k. that is very concerning to the u.s. because he has raised the stakes by saying he would put it to the british people in the referendum. if they vote to get out of the e.u. that could fundamentally change that relationship. >> let's listen to a little bit of your interview there. >> you see all the economic turmoil in europe. you see it over here, as well, in the u.s., the rambling over the fiscal cliff. it seems to be endless economic uncertainty. >> president obama and i have agreed that different countries should take different pathways according to circumstances and america i
. as teens, you know, we're so used to that, that euroing i dok it's at all strange. >> this doesn't shock you that this guy thought he had a girlfriend and never met her. >> unfortunately, no. >> sam. >> what's different about our generation we don't group online relationships and interpersonal relationships differently and think they're the same thing. we talk to someone online, text th them, e -mail them. >> talking about a girlfriend. would either of you label someone online a girlfriend or boyfriend you never met in person? >> absolutely not. >> one thing i say with manti te'o one thing he differe differentiated. he forget the personal part. >> we wouldn't do that. >> the dismiss that. >> i will bring you in, in a second, doctor. we asked our viewer, more than 25,000 responded. are you surprised someone can develop an emotional relationship with someone online, 76% said now and 24% said yes. >> their generation doesn't know life without the internet, texting, facebooking, this is how friendships and relations p relationshirelationshi relationships develop, you and i know getting on t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)